E 1 | Orals | SPHC 2024

Room

1er étage - F130


Theme

Health information for better health literacy


Chair

TBD.




Title
Capturing patient experiences and outcomes in Swiss primary care with the PaRIS survey

Name
Sylvan Berrut

Affiliation
Unisanté


Abstract

Introduction:
Enhancing the quality of care and health outcomes for people living with chronic conditions involves reconfiguring health systems to enable primary care (PC) providers to implement person-centered and coordinated care. As patient-reported information regarding improvement priorities for PC is lacking in most countries, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) developed and implemented an international survey known as the “PaRIS survey of Patients with Chronic Conditions”. The survey is designed to provide insights on patient-reported outcomes (PROMs) and experiences (PREMs) as well as how these relate to characteristics of PC practices. The PaRIS survey was launched in 2023 in 20 countries, including Switzerland. 

Methods:
The survey followed a nested design, with the recruitment of PC providers first and their patients subsequently. Over 1’500 individual PC providers were randomly sampled from the federal register of medical professions (MedReg) and invited to participate. To minimize workload for practitioners, a consecutive patient sampling method was implemented: practices were instructed to hand out participation cards to all patients ≥45 years old, living in the community and visiting the practice within the data collection period (January – March 2024). Data were collected with two online questionnaires: the provider questionnaire, collecting information on characteristics of PC practices and the patient questionnaire, including PROMs, PREMs and other characteristics (demographics, chronic conditions, health and care capabilities, health behaviors). 

Results:
127 PC providers responded to the provider questionnaire. Over 1’000 patients have completed the survey so far (targeted patient sample size is 7’500). We will provide further information on the innovative methods used for practitioner recruitment and survey implementation in Switzerland, as well as insights on the key findings from the survey. 

Conclusion:
The PaRIS survey aims to comprehensively assess the strengths and weaknesses of PC, by collecting valuable insights from the self-reported experiences and outcomes of PC patients. This initiative seeks to fill the existing information gap in Switzerland and other countries regarding the performance of PC. It also seeks to facilitate and promote international comparisons and cross-country knowledge exchange, shedding light on how health systems worldwide address the needs of people with chronic conditions in PC.



Title
ges.UND? – EBPI Gesundheitsblog der UZH

Name
Annegret Borchard

Affiliation
ges.UND? – EBPI Gesundheitsblog der UZH


Abstract

Hintergrund und Ziel des Blogs:
Seit Februar 2021 besteht ges.UND?, der Gesundheitsblog des Instituts für Epidemiologie, Biostatistik und Prävention (EBPI) der Universität Zürich. Mit dem Blog möchten wir die Bevölkerung bei ihren Gesundheitsentscheidungen unterstützen. Auf Grundlage strukturierter Übersichtsarbeiten fassen wir anschaulich, verständlich und transparent Gesundheitsinformationen zusammen. Als unabhängige und vertrauenswürdige Quelle wollen wir so der Verbreitung von Fake News im Gesundheitsbereich entgegenwirken.

Häufigkeit und Schwerpunkte des Blogs:
In der Regel veröffentlichen wir einen Blogbeitrag pro Monat. Unsere bisherigen Schwerpunktthemen sind «Gesundes Altern» und «Covid». Zusätzliche Beiträge widmen sich beispielsweise Themen wie Demenz, Krebsfrüherkennung und -behandlung oder Depression. Neben unterschiedlichen Themen fokussieren wir auch auf verschiedene Lebensphasen. Zudem setzten wir unterschiedliche Formate ein: So führen wir Interviews mit Experten durch, erstellen Videos und klassische Blogbeiträge. Die eindeutigen Seitenansichten stiegen von 2686 im Jahr 2021 auf 6763 im Jahr 2022. Im Jahr 2023 lasen bereits 8721 Personen den Blog.

Dissemination:
Um den Blog möglichst bekannt zu machen, bewerben wir jeden Blogbeitrag sowohl über interne Kanäle als auch externe Kanäle: So publizieren wir intern unsere neusten Blogbeiträge jeweils über einen institutsinternen Newsletter sowie über Universitäts-Bildschirme. Extern kommunizieren wir unsere Blogs über Social-Media-Kanäle und Webseiten - wie z.B. Public Health Schweiz, Swiss School of Public Health SSPH+ oder prevention.ch. Daneben bewerben wir unsere Blogbeiträge in verschiedensten Newslettern. Seit 2023 haben wir auch einen eigenen Newsletter für den Blog. Diesen versenden wir immer dann, wenn ein neuer Blogbeitrag veröffentlicht wurde. Auf der Website von ges.UND? besteht die Möglichkeit sich für den Newsletter anzumelden.

Vortrag:
Im Vortrag möchten wir einige Aspekte des Blogs vorstellen und in Austausch mit Ihnen treten. Uns interessieren insbesondere folgende Fragen: Welche Gesundheitsthemen interessieren Sie besonders? Welche Formate bevorzugen Sie? Und wie können wir den Blog noch attraktiver und bekannter machen?

Wir freuen uns auf den Austausch und Ihre Ideen!



Title
Towards health democracy: an overview of the characteristics of social participation

Name
Nelly Courvoisier

Affiliation
Unisanté


Abstract

Context and aim:
Initiatives to reintroduce patients as experts of their experiences of illness since the 70’s have evolved towards the ambition of cultivating health democracy nowadays. New initiatives have been created to engage the wider society in health decision-making. This literature review aims to describe the dimensions defining social participation in health in its current state in the international context, identifying its objectives, characteristics, and outlining other issues implied. 

Methods:
The review consisted in exploring scientific and grey literature on social participation in health until October 2023. Searched databases were Google, Google Scholar, PubMed and Web of Science. References covering dimensions defining social participation in health were retained. Mere descriptions of case studies were excluded. The information gathered was synthesized within themes on the properties of social participation in health. 

Results:
Fifty references - studies and reports from national and international institutions - were included. While general objective of social participation in health (to engage the population in health decision-making to meet health and care needs – especially people whose access to the healthcare system is restricted or for whom outcomes are less good) was consensual, its definition was plural and covered a wide range of initiatives. The relevant dimensions of social participation in health were levels of involvement of participants, principles of good practice, and the definition of the population’s role. Power relations in which these dimensions unfold influence participants’ adherence to the objectives of social participation, the deployment of practices and their impact. Institutionalization within a legal framework was supposed to improve the quality and quantity of social participation, but established practices prior to legislation was considered decisive. 

Conclusion: 
The relevant dimensions of social participation in health are documented in the literature. The latter shows that the democratic context and power relations have an overall determinant influence on the practices and their impact. This should thus be considered when designing actions towards health democracy.  In the context of Switzerland, further work should determine how power relations and direct democracy influence the deployment of initiatives and what would best allow to achieve health democracy.



Title
Towards a shared understanding of health literacy in Switzerland 

Name
Rebecca Jaks

Affiliation
Careum Zentrum für Gesundheitskompetenz


Abstract

Background/Objective:
In times of polycrisis, we face grand global challenges related to public health such as the digital transformation, climate change, wars, demographic changes, or the COVID-19 pandemic. The interconnection and domino effects due to the polycrisis highlight the crucial role of the capacity to adequately deal with health information, services, and more generally with health-related challenges. Considering both these current dynamics as well as the great potential of health literacy (HL) to empower people to act and positively influence their own and other’s health and well-being, a more diverse, context-specific, yet holistic and common understanding of the concept of HL is needed. Thus, on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH), the Careum Center for Health Literacy has developed a practice-oriented concept paper on HL for the Swiss context. 

Methods:
The concept paper has been developed in collaboration with an advisory board and the Swiss Alliance of HL. This participative process involved an in-depth literature review, six semi-structured interviews with experts within the field of HL as well as several exchanges and reflections with multiple relevant stakeholders from the three main linguistic regions in Switzerland.  

Results:
As a main result, working definitions for HL and HL enablers as well as seven underlying principles have been developed. HL is thereby understood as a bundle of (interrelated) competences needed to proactively deal with health-related information, services and challenges to make sound decisions for our own and other’s health and well-being. The distinction in these two perspectives on HL enables the understanding of HL as a capacity and an empowerment or agency of people, and HL enablers as facilitator for the development and strengthening of HL. 

Conclusion:
 HL is a key resource to be able to manage current health-related challenges such as the infodemic or the general increase in uncertainty and complexity regarding health issues. A shared and future-oriented conceptualization of HL is fundamental for its successful application in research, policy and practice. This concept paper – participatively developed by Swiss experts beyond disciplinary and cantonal boundaries – and the resulting constructive dialog among relevant stakeholders is a first step in this direction.



Title
Heat competence of the aged 50+ years in Switzerland: knowledge, concern, coping behavior

Name
Cristian Martucci

Affiliation
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (SwissTPH)


Abstract

Increasing heat stress in Switzerland poses a health risk to the population. In the summer of 2023, a telephone survey was conducted on behalf of the Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH)  and the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN), targeting a representative sample of Swiss residents aged 50 years and over (n=1803). The study aimed to investigate heat competence, including knowledge of health risks and behavioural measures, the perception of concern due the heat and the implementation of heat protection measures. Data was analysed with survey methods weighted by age group, gender and language region according to the Swiss population distribution.

Around 69% of the population aged 50+ years were aware of up to three of the eight different heat-related behavioural measures. The behavioural recommendations for hot days were generally well received. In addition to traditional media, weather apps and the social environment were often reported as sources of information, while the workplace and health professionals were mentioned less. For over half of the population aged 50+ years, the heat in summer 2023 was a burden, with relevant variations by population characteristics and major regions. One-third of individuals over 75 years old with chronic illnesses did not recognise their potential health risks associated with heat. Compared to German-speaking Switzerland, there was a higher level of perceived heat stress in French-speaking and Italian-speaking Switzerland (Ticino), as well as a higher level of agreement that heat poses a health risk. 

This study is the first comprehensive, nationwide and representative survey of the population in Switzerland on the topic of heat and health. It can serve as a baseline for monitoring and provides information on the current state of heat competence in the Swiss population and the effectiveness of official heat protection measures. The results show that a broader knowledge of behavioural options should be promoted. Further, there is potential for raising awareness in the workplace and through health professionals. Observed regional differences may be due to a broader sensitisation of the population through cantonal heat action plans implemented in Ticino and in various cantons in French-speaking Switzerland. The results emphasise the importance of adapting to increasing heat stress and suggest possible actions to improve the heat competence of the population.